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I was laughing too hard to get through the article. It is amazing what you can get away with if you don't use trigger words.

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"I expect other egalitarian models in archaeology and anthropology will be similarly overturned in the coming years."

That sounds optimistic. Such an outcome assumes (1) a critical number of brave and financially independent researchers with access to research tools and (2) inefficient censorship by the rulers of academia, finance, politics, media. These are large assumptions.

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Mar 18·edited Mar 19Author

No, there has already been a lot of progress. David Reich discusses this in his 2017 book, and since then much more has happened. Just the other day we got this:

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2024.03.13.584607v1

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Data from 23andme is nice. But there's also the evidence from your own EYES. If you watch the travel videos from the Dominican Republic, you can see that the people there have more European admixture. They are mostly brown and not black. They look like typical people from Guatemala or Venezuela.

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Very interesting (tak, Emil). I note at least three names on that very long list of contributors (why so long?) who would rather commit seppuku than admit racial differences in you know what. Namely, Lotte Hedeager, her husband Kristian Kristiansen (both known to me personally), and Eske Willerslew. These authors are talking about Germanic populations, whose existence they accept as not just constructs. That is already something, I agree, because even without stating it explicitly, these authors admit that populations defined genetically may differ, as when one population replaces another.

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Mar 18·edited Mar 18

" From a historical perspective, these kinds of findings show that we have returned to where science in this field began"

Some analyses are not still meaningful such as this map from perspective of population genetic.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_Grant#/media/File%3APassing_of_the_Great_Race_-_Map_4.jpg

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Yes, I don't think that one works in the light of genomics.

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>This is an example of the usual finding that social race groups that are more heterogeneous do not function as well as those that are more clear (closer approximations of natural differences).

Dominicans might be harder to classify than Haitians, but their society functions much better than Haiti... not sure what you mean here.

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Haitians are easier to classify using CT scans because their ancestry is more homogeneous.

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